Home > Wild Parrots > Brazil Trip Part Three: Quaker Parakeets

Brazil Trip Part Three: Quaker Parakeets

I have been writing a series of posts about a recent trip I took to Brazil, and today I am writing about Quaker Parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus).  All the pictures with this update were taken in the southern Pantanal region of Brazil. Quaker Parakeets are very common there.  Where I stayed, they had built several nests at the top of palm trees.  The dead leaves hanging over the nests acted like “curtains” over the entrance of their nests.  The palm leaves concealed many of the nests, but here’s one where I could see the entrance:

Quaker Parakeet Nest

Quaker Parakeet Nest

Quakers are the only parrot species that creates such large nests out of sticks. Most parrots nest in natural tree cavities, although a few species will nest in the side of cliffs.  Quaker nests are communal affairs, and several birds will live in each nest.  They use the nests for raising young, but they also sleep in the nests during the non-breeding season.  One nest may have several “doors” and chambers. Young Quaker Parakeets may help their parents raise young before they start families of their own.

There is one subspecies of Quaker Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus luchsi), found in central Bolivia, that nests in cliffs

Quakers and their nest, which is underneath the palm leaves.

Quakers and their nest, which is underneath the palm leaves.

Wild Quakers are incredibly busy birds and seem to spend quite a bit of the day adding sticks to their nests.  They are also very noisy which makes their nests quite easy to locate. They even chatter away while inside the nests and only quiet down once it starts to get dark.

Quakers in their nest

Quakers in their nest

Quaker Parakeet

Quaker Parakeet

Quaker Parakeet stretching

Quaker Parakeet stretching

Quaker Parakeets may also be referred to as “Monk Parakeets.” Their natural range includes southern Brazil, northern Argentina, Bolivia, Uruguay, and Paraguay. They tend to occur in open woodlands. However, introduced populations occur in parts of the United States, Japan, Puerto Rico,  Israel, Bermuda, and Europe. Most of these introduced populations live in cities.

A Quaker Parakeet adding a stick to its nest

A Quaker Parakeet adding a stick to its nest

Quaker Parakeets will sometimes nest in the “basement” of Jabiru Stork nests. Jabiru Storks are the largest of their kind, and are common in the Pantanal. Their nests, like the nests of quakers, are large and built out of sticks. Jabirus will tolerate the presence of Quaker Parakeets in their nests.

A Jabiru Stork nest

A Jabiru Stork nest

Jabiru Stork

Jabiru Stork

The next post in this series will concern the two species of macaw I saw: Hyacinth Macaws and Greenwing Macaws.

Related posts in this series:

Brazil Trip Part One: Yellow-chevroned Parakeets and Peach-fronted Conures

Brazil Trip Part Two: Blue-fronted Amazons and Nanday Conures

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