Home > Birds, Miscellaneous > Brazil Trip Part Five: Other Birds

Brazil Trip Part Five: Other Birds

Today, I am going to share photos of  some of the “non-parrot” birds I saw in Brazil.

This first set of  photos is of birds  I saw in and around Pirenopolis, a town about 150 km from Brasilia. It was a nice town to visit.

A burrowing owl outside its den in a horse pasture. They were surprisingly common.

A burrowing owl outside its den in a horse pasture. They were surprisingly common.

Heron

Whistling Heron

A kingfisher.

A (ringed?) kingfisher. Kingfishers are one of my favorite bird types. They're very beautiful.

Red-legged Seriema. These were quite common in open areas, such as in cattle pastures.

Red-legged Seriema. These were quite common in open areas, such as in cattle pastures.

Toco Toucan eating palm fruits.

Toco Toucan eating palm fruits.

This next set of pictures was taken at the Parque das Nacoes Indigenas in Campo Grande, which was right across from the hotel I stayed at. This park is quite big and has a lot of birds, in addition to a herd of capybara. There are also museums around it and a restaurant.

Bittern

A Campo Flicker.

A Campo Flicker.

A Great Kiskadee. These guys are very common, both in the countryside and in cities. This guy was banging the heck out of that nut to get it open.

A Great Kiskadee. These guys are very common, both in the countryside and in cities. This guy was banging the heck out of that nut to break it into bite-sized pieces.

And now for bird pictures taken in the countryside of the southern Pantanal region.

Crested Caracara. They are very common in the Pantanal. They're pretty flexible and will scavenge but can also hunt.

Crested Caracara. They are very common in the Pantanal. They're pretty flexible and will scavenge but can also hunt. They're like a raptor crossed with a crow.

Chestnut-eared Aracari, a small species of toucan.

Chestnut-eared Aracari, a small species of toucan.

Rheas, South America's version of the ostrich.

Rheas, South America's version of the ostrich.

Screamers, screaming.

Screamers, screaming.

Guinea Fowl, a domestic bird that originated in sub-Saharan Africa. I just found it funny that they would chase the truck.

Guinea Fowl, a domestic bird that originated in sub-Saharan Africa. I just found it funny that they would chase the truck like this.

Wood Storks.

Wood Storks.

And finally, some Bare-faced Currasows I saw at a farm near Bonito:

The male.

The male.

A pair. The male is the black one.

A pair. The male is the black one.

The next post in this series will show pictures of the mammals I saw.

Related Posts:

Brazil Trip Part One: Yellow-chevroned Parakeets and Peach-fronted Conures

Brazil Trip Part Two: Nanday Conures and Blue-fronted Amazons

Brazil Trip Part Three: Quaker Parakeets

Brazil Trip Part Four: Hyacinth and Greewing Macaws, with a bonus Conure!

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